South Carolina

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Early South Carolina Settlement

After Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland (1630–1685) was restored to the English throne following Oliver Cromwell’s

Protectorate, he granted the chartered Carolina territory to eight of his loyal friends, known as the Lords Proprietors, in 1663.

It took seven years before the Lords could arrange for settlement, the first being that of Charles Town. The community was

established by English settlers in 1670 from Bermuda, under the first Governor of South Carolina, William Sayle, on the west

bank of the Ashley River, a few miles northwest of the present city. It was soon chosen by Anthony Ashley-Cooper, one of the

Lords Proprietors, to become a “great port towne”, a destiny which the city fulfilled. By 1680, the settlement had grown, joined

by others from England, Barbados, and Virginia, and relocated to its current peninsular location. The capital of the Carolina

colony, Charleston was the center for further expansion and the southernmost point of English settlement during the late 17th

century.The settlement was often subject to attack from sea and from land. Periodic assaults from Spain and France (like the

1706 failed expedition during Queen Anne’s War), who still contested England’s claims to the region, were combined with

resistance from Native Americans, as well as pirate raids. Charleston’s colonists erected afortification wall around the small

settlement to aid in its defense. Two buildings remain from the Walled City, the Powder Magazine, where the city’s supply of

gunpowder was stored, and the Pink House, believed to have been an old colonial tavern.[1]A 1680 plan for the new settlement,

the Grand Modell, laid out “the model of an exact regular town,” and the future for the growing community. Land surrounding

the intersection of Meeting and Broad Streets was set aside for a Civic Square. Over time it became known as the Four Corners

of the Law, referring to the various arms of governmental and religious law presiding over the square and the growing city. St.

Michael’s Episcopal Church, Charleston’s oldest and most noted church, was built on the southeast corner in 1752. The

following year the Capitol of the colony was erected across the square. Because of its prominent position within the city and its

elegant architecture, the building signaled to Charleston’s citizens and visitors its importance within the British colonies.

Provincial court met on the ground floor, the Commons House of Assembly and the Royal Governor’s Council Chamber met on the second floor.

By the mid-18th century Charleston had become a bustling trade center, the hub of the Atlantic trade for the southern colonies,

and the wealthiest and largest city south of Philadelphia. By 1770 it was the fourth largest port in the colonies, after only

, New York, and Philadelphia, with a population of 11,000, slightly more than half of that slaves. Rice and indigo had been

successfully cultivated by slave-owning planters in the surrounding coastal low-country. Those and naval stores were exported

in an extremely profitable shipping industry. It was the cultural and economic center of the South.

 

Districts[edit] -

                                    Cheraw District created in 1769 

                                    Ninety-Six District created in 1769:  For more information:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ninety-Six_District,_South_Carolina

                                    Camden District created in 1769

                                    Pinckney District 1791-1798

                                    Washington District 1785-1798:  For more information:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_District,_South_Carolina

                                    Pendleton District created in 1789 from Cherokee lands:  For more information: 

                                                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_District,_South_Carolina

 

 

 

County

FIPS code
[4]

County seat
[5]

Established
[5]

Origin

Abbeville County

001

Abbeville

1785

Ninety-Six District

Aiken County

003

Aiken

1871

Barnwell, Edgefield, Lexington, and Orangeburg

Allendale County

005

Allendale

1919

Barnwell and Hampton

Anderson County

007

Anderson

1826

Pendleton District

Bamberg County

009

Bamberg

1897

Barnwell

Barnwell County

011

Barnwell

1798

Orangeburg

Beaufort County

013

Beaufort

1769

1769 Judicial District

Berkeley County

015

Moncks Corner

1882

Charleston

Calhoun County

017

St. Matthews

1908

Lexington and Orangeburg

Charleston County

019

Charleston

1769

1769 Judicial District

Cherokee County

021

Gaffney

1897

Spartanburg, Union, and York

Chester County

023

Chester

1785

Camden District

Chesterfield County

025

Chesterfield

1798

Cheraws District

Clarendon County

027

Manning

1855

Sumter

Colleton County

029

Walterboro

1800

Charleston

Darlington County

031

Darlington

1785

Cheraws District

Dillon County

033

Dillon

1910

Marion

Dorchester County

035

St. George

1868

Berkeley and Colleton

Edgefield County

037

Edgefield

1785

Ninety-Six District

Fairfield County

039

Winnsboro

1785

Camden District

Florence County

041

Florence

1888

Clarendon, Darlington, Marion, and Williamsburg

Georgetown County

043

Georgetown

1769

1769 Judicial District

Greenville County

045

Greenville

1798

Washington District

Greenwood County

047

Greenwood

1897

Abbeville and Edgefield

Hampton County

049

Hampton

1787

Beaufort

Horry County

051

Conway

1801

Georgetown

Jasper County

053

Ridgeland

1912

Beaufort and Hampton

Kershaw County

055

Camden

1798

Claremont, Fairfield, Lancaster, and Richland

Lancaster County

057

Lancaster

1798

Camden District

Laurens County

059

Laurens

1785

Ninety-Six District

Lee County

061

Bishopville

1902

Darlington, Kershaw, and Sumter

Lexington County

063

Lexington

1804

Orangeburg

Marion County

067

Marion

1800

Georgetown

Marlboro County

069

Bennettsville

1798

Cheraws District

McCormick County

065

McCormick

1914

Abbeville, Edgefield, and Greenwood

Newberry County

071

Newberry

1785

Ninety-Six District

Oconee County

073

Walhalla

1868

Pickens

Orangeburg County

075

Orangeburg

1769

1769 Judicial District

Pickens County

077

Pickens

1826

Pendleton District

Richland County

079

Columbia

1799

Camden District

Saluda County

081

Saluda

1896

Edgefield

Spartanburg County

083

Spartanburg

1785

Ninety-Six District

Sumter County

085

Sumter

1798

Claremont, Clarendon, and Salem

Union County

087

Union

1798

Ninety-Six District

Williamsburg County

089

Kingstree

1802

Georgetown District

York County

091

York

1798

Camden District

Parishes

Until the late 19th century, the Lowcountry of South Carolina was divided into Parishes which themselves subdivided several "districts," these civil parishes were based on and generally coincident (even well after disestablishment) with Anglican ecclesiastical parishes.[6]

Counties

Districts

Proposed counties